Moody Painting

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Moody Painting
Moody Painting NH Texture.png
The Moody Painting in Animal Crossing: New Horizons
Real-world counterpart
The Sower
Year Unknown
Artist Millet
Main appearances
Name in other languages
 ちからづよいめいが
 强健的名画
 Toile puissante
 Retrato joven
 Quadro possente
 Энергичная картина
 힘찬 명화
 強健的名畫
 Toile puissante
 Retrato joven
 Kraftgemälde
 Noest schilderij


The Moody Painting is a painting in the Animal Crossing series introduced in Animal Crossing: City Folk. It is based on Jean-François Millet's The Sower; it is one of two of Millet pieces to appear in the Animal Crossing series, alongside the Common Painting.

Art details[edit]

In City Folk[edit]

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Buy Price  3,920 Bells
Sell Price  490 Bells[nb 1]
Obtain from  Crazy Redd's
Authenticity This painting can be a forgery.
Furniture Size 1.0 x 1.0
  1. Sells for 10 Bells if it is a forgery.


In New Leaf[edit]

Moody Painting
The Sower
Artist: Jean-François Millet
Made around 1850
Oil on canvas


Description This painting features a small town where the artist once lived. He is said to have influenced van Gogh.
Buy Price  3,920 Bells
Sell Price  490 Bells
Obtain from  Redd's Gallery
Authenticity This painting is always genuine.
Furniture Size 1.0 x 1.0


In New Horizons[edit]

Moody Painting
The Sower
Jean-François Millet, circa 1850
Oil on canvas


Description Millet painted this piece of a farmer sowing wheat seeds in a field after moving to the countryside from Paris. If the piece reminds you of Van Gogh, that's likely because Van Gogh himself was inspired by it!
Buy Price  4980 Bells
Sell Price  1245 Bells
Obtain from  Jolly Redd's Treasure Trawler
Authenticity This painting is always genuine.
Furniture Size 1.0 x 1.0

Real-world information[edit]

The Sower

A pioneering work of realism, this oil painting, completed in 1850, shows a glum-looking peasant sowing seeds in a field. This image of poverty enraged the upper classes of France at the time, who criticized his work for showing how workers struggled- many paintings at this time expressed an idyllic middle-class life, full of color and warmth.

The Sower is currently on display in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts.