Great Statue

From Nookipedia, the Animal Crossing wiki
Great Statue
Great Statue NH Icon.png
Real-world counterpart
Kamehameha I
Year Unknown
Artist Thomas Ridgeway Gould
Main appearances
Name in other languages
 いだいなちょうこく
 伟大的雕塑
 Statue imposante
 Estatua triunfante
 Statua trionfante
 Великая статуя
 위대한 조각
 偉大的雕塑
 Statue imposante
 Estatua triunfante
 Würdestatue
 Majestueus standbeeld


The Great Statue is a statue in the Animal Crossing series introduced in Animal Crossing: New Leaf. It is based on Thomas Ridgeway Gould's King Kamehameha I.

Art details[edit]

In New Leaf[edit]

Great Statue
King Kamehameha I
Artist: Thomas Ridgeway Gould
Made around 1880
Bronze


Fake Great Statue
Great Statue

Description This statue depicts the man who unified the Hawaiian Islands. The original was nearly lost at sea.
Buy Price  3,920 Bells
Sell Price  490 Bells [nb 1]
Obtain from  Redd's Gallery
Authenticity In the forgery, Kamehameha's hand is pointed downwards. If his hand is pointed upwards, it is genuine.
Furniture Size 1.0 x 1.0
  1. Cannot be sold if it is a forgery. Will be charged  100 Bells from Re-Tail.

In New Horizons[edit]

Great Statue
King Kamehameha I
Thomas Ridgeway Gould, circa 1883
Bronze


Description A bronze sculpture of King Kamehameha I, who founded the Kingdom of Hawaii in 1810. Traditionally, the sculpture is draped with many leis every year on June 11th.
Buy Price  4980 Bells
Sell Price  1245 Bells
Obtain from  Jolly Redd's Treasure Trawler
Authenticity This statue is always genuine.
Furniture Size 2.0 x 2.0


Real-world information[edit]

Kamehameha I

Sculpted by Thomas Gould in Florence, this 18-foot bronze statue of Kamehameha is one of Oahu's most photographed landmarks. Every June 11th, on Kamehameha Day, this statue is ceremoniously draped with wreaths of flower lei to celebrate Hawaii's greatest king.

A great warrior, diplomat, and leader, King Kamehameha I united the Hawaiian Islands into one royal kingdom in 1810 after years of conflict. Kamehameha's unification of Hawaii was significant not only because it was an incredible feat, but also because under separate rule, the islands may have been torn apart by competing western interests. Today, four commissioned statues stand to honor King Kamehameha I, Hawaii's first king.